Dan Tudor

Join The Newsletter and Stay Up To Date!

Text Size Increase Decrease

The Hidden Message in Your Upcoming Recruiting CallsMonday, June 28th, 2010

Many of you will have some pretty big phone calls to make in the not too distant future.

The first phone calls to a new class or recruits.  And if you don’t in July, you will shortly after that, depending upon your sport.

Today’s edition is not going to focus on the how-to “nuts and bolts” of making successful phone calls.  We’ve done that in the past…here, here and a great one from a few years ago here.

What I want to focus on today is a bigger picture aspect of your recruiting message that applies to your phone calls, as well as your emails, letters, campus visits…everything about the overall impression you give your prospect as you communicate with them.

It’s the importance of a consistent message.  One that makes sense.  And, I’ve got a pretty interesting study to back up my assertions…

The study was done by psychologist Geoffrey Miller, who studied how we as individuals communicate our individual purchases to others, and why.

For example, as the study showed, younger males will often display aggressive behavior to young females in order to establish social dominance in the initial stages of a relationship.  Later, however, those same males need to move from being aggressive to being agreeable in order to show that they have “staying power”…that they will be a good long-term mate.

So if the study is true – as I think it is – products that appeal to a younger males aggressive side are going to do great.  For example, if I was manufacturing a body spray for guys and named it “Sweet”, it probably wouldn’t sell.  That doesn’t match their natural personalities.  However, the people who manufacture “Axe” nailed it.  They’ve got a runaway best seller because they’ve marketed it well to the audience they want as consumers.

An example of a wrongly aimed message?  The Chevy Tahoe Hybrid SUV from a few years ago.  It was marketed with a strong message of environmental sensitivity and high fuel savings.  For the people who wanted to buy a massive SUV, this message didn’t make sense: If I want to drive an SUV, would the extra 4 miles per gallon really matter to me?  Probably not.  Sales never took off, and most experts point to muddled advertising as the big reason why.

Here’s my point as it relates to the phone calls you are about to make, as well as the message that you design for your program this coming year:

Make sure you and your program develops a message that very clearly matches your actual environment on campus that are true selling points to your intended prospects.

  • Figure out who your audience is, and communicate clearly and directly to them.
  • Don’t try to be something that you aren’t.
  • Find two or three big things that define you and your program.
  • Determine the best language for you to use with your audience (your prospects) based on those big things that you find as positives about your program.
  • Don’t blur your central messages with things that your competitors offer in an attempt to be “just like them”.  Be O.K. with being unique and different from your competition.

Your phone calls that many of you will be making soon are your first opportunity to define yourself to new prospects who are waiting to be told your story.  Make that story you tell simple and effective as you start telling it to them over the phone.

 

The 6 Secrets to Making GREAT Recruiting Phone CallsMonday, June 21st, 2010

The information you are trying to access is reserved for our Clients and Premium Members. Please log in.

Encountering Greatness: Remembering My Three Hours with John WoodenMonday, June 21st, 2010

The information you are trying to access is reserved for our Clients and Premium Members. Please log in.

Unconscious Recruiting Decisions Your Prospects MakeMonday, June 14th, 2010

The information you are trying to access is reserved for our Clients and Premium Members. Please log in.

Using Google Voice to Never Miss a Recruiting CallMonday, June 14th, 2010

The information you are trying to access is reserved for our Clients and Premium Members. Please log in.

How to Give Your Prospect a Deadline for DecidingMonday, June 7th, 2010

The information you are trying to access is reserved for our Clients and Premium Members. Please log in.

  • Not a member? Click here to signup.

Categories

Archives